Astronomy

What is the last day a waning moon is visible in daytime (the afternoon)?

What is the last day a waning moon is visible in daytime (the afternoon)?


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From the fourth quarter onward, can we see the moon in the afternoon sky?


At third quarter the moon rises at about midnight and sets at about midday The exact rising times depends on the position of the moon relative to the ecliptic and the season.

So in spring, at third quarter, the moon is low and sets quite early (around 10:00 in my location) In Autumn the moon is high at third quarter, and sets at about 15:00 (though daylight saving time affects this)

As the month progresses the moon rises later and sets later. The moon is above the horizon in the afternoon, but visibility depends on many factors, and a very thin cresent, close to the sun, may not be visible with the naked eye. There is some analysis of this with respect to the appearance of the new moon, (which has calendrical significance to some religions) There are too many uncertainties in determining visibility to give a simple answer, much depends on the observer.


Planets of the Month: JANUARY

Venus. After the start of morning twilight, Venus rises, but does not come up very high before dawn gets too bright. By the end of the month, Venus will appear dim. On the 11th, the think Moon illuminated only 3 percent, will be just 4 degrees from Venus.

Planet Parade Evening Sky (Jupiter, Saturn, Mercury, Moon). Jupiter and Saturn will still be closer than 2 degrees from each other until the 8th. The 7th or 8th is the last day Saturn is visible by naked eye. But don’t neglect these planets the following days! On the 9th, Mercury will be only 1.5 degrees from Saturn. To spot
Mercury, you might also need binoculars, but the close trio is easy to find because of bright Jupiter. The

following evening, Mercury will be closer to Jupiter than to Saturn and probably visible by naked eye. After the 10th, you will see Mercury and Jupiter separating very quickly. On the 13th, the Moon will be next to Jupiter and Mercury, but Saturn will be too low to add to the small configuration. Jupiter will eave the scene at the middle of the month, while Mercury will hold out until the end of the month.

After these three planets have set, Mars remains up until after 1 am It moves from Pisces into Aries in an area without bright stars. With Mars transiting 70 degrees high around 7 pm, it is placed conveniently to be viewed in a telescope. It still shows features at 10 arc-seconds diameter, but not like in October when it was twice as large. On the 21st, Mars passes 1.7 degrees north of Uranus, a good opportunity to easily find Uranus in binoculars.

Neptune is further west and lower. It is also fainter and more difficult to find.

Vesta, minor planet number 4, is magnitude 7 in Leo and getting ready for naked eye visibility in February and March.

During January, sunset shifts by 26 minutes. It further shifts for the following five months, but the shift each month will be less than in January. On the other hand, sunrise on the 31st will be only 7 minutes earlier than on the 1st, far eclipsed by the 38 minute shift during March.


The Next Full Moon is the Snow, Storm, and Hunger Moon

The next full Moon will be early Saturday morning, February 27, 2021, appearing opposite the Sun in Earth-based longitude at 3:17 AM EST. This will be on Friday night from Alaska's timezone westward to the International Date Line. The Moon will appear full for about three days around this time, from Thursday night through Sunday morning.

In the 1930's the Maine Farmer's Almanac began publishing "Indian" Moon names for each month of the year. These names have become popular and widely known. According to this almanac, as the full Moon in February, the tribes of what is now the northeastern United States called this the Snow Moon or the Storm Moon because of the heavy snows that fall in this season. The last time I checked (which was several years ago), NOAA long-term monthly averages for the Washington, DC area showed January and February were nearly tied as the snowiest months of the year. Bad weather and heavy snowstorms made hunting difficult, so this Moon was also called the Hunger Moon. Across North America there are many different Native American names for the full Moons.

Sunset on Thursday, February 25 to nightfall on Friday, February 26, 2021, will be the Purim holiday in the Hebrew calendar. Purim is celebrated on the 14th day of Adar in the Hebrew calendar (or on the 15th in Jerusalem and ancient walled cities). This means it occurs just before the full Moon in Adar. Purim marks the Jewish people&rsquos deliverance from a royal death decree around the fourth century BCE, as told in the Book of Esther and is celebrated by exchanging gifts of food and drink, feasting, and donating to charity.

February 26, 2021, will be the Chinese Lantern Festival. This is the traditional end of the Chinese New Year celebrations and is held on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese Calendar.

In the Purnimanta tradition that ends the months on the full Moon day, this full Moon (purnima) is Magha Purnima, the last day of the month of Magha. In the Hindu and Buddhist calendars, Magha is the lunar month when the full Moon is in the lunar mansion that contains the star we call Regulus. For Hindus, Magha is a month for austerity, performing acts of charity, and ritual bathing at the confluence of three rivers (triveni sangam) and other holy riverside locations. At four of these locations major pilgrimages and festivals are sometimes held based on the position the Sun, Moon, and the planet Jupiter in different zodiac constellations. Some versions of Hindu legend say that drops from a pot of the nectar of immortality spilled onto Earth at these locations. The name for these festivals, Kumbh Mela, comes from the Sanskrit words for "pitcher" or "pot" and the words for "meet" or "assemble." This year (2021) will be the Kumbh Mela at Haridwar, a holy site where the river Ganges leaves the foothills of the Himalayas and enters the Indo-Gangetic Plain. There are strict COVID-19 guidelines in place at Haridwar for the safety of the pilgrims.

For Buddhists, this full Moon corresponds with Māgha Pūjā, the second-most important festival of the year. Māgha Pūjā is celebrated on the full Moon day of the third lunar month in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Sri Lanka and on the full Moon day of Tabaung in Myanmar. It celebrates a gathering of the Buddha with 1,250 of his first disciples, which, according to tradition, preceded the custom of periodic recitation of discipline by monks. On the day, Buddhists celebrate the creation of an ideal and exemplary community, which is why it is sometimes called Saṅgha Day, Saṅgha referring to the Buddhist community. In Thailand, the Pāli term Māgha-pūraṇamī is also used for the celebration. Some authors referred to this day as the Buddhist All Saints Day. In Sri Lanka, Māgha Pūjā is also observed with a procession of approximately 5,000 people and many elephants, called Gangarama Navam.

In most lunar and lunisolar calendars the months change with the new Moon and full Moons fall in the middle of the lunar month. This full Moon is the middle of the first month of the Chinese calendar, Adar in the Hebrew calendar, and Rajab in the Islamic calendar. Rajab is one of the four sacred months in which warfare and fighting are forbidden.

As usual, the wearing of suitably celebratory celestial attire is encouraged in honor of the full Moon. Stay warm watch out for snowstorms avoid starting wars do what you can to reduce hunger including gifts of food and other acts of charity and when the weather is clear take advantage of these early nightfalls to get out, look up, and share the wonders of the sky!

Here is a summary of celestial events between now and the full Moon after next (with angles and times based on the location of NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC):

As winter ends and spring begins in the northern hemisphere, the daily periods of sunlight continue to lengthen, changing at their fastest around the vernal or spring equinox. On Saturday, February 27, 2021 (the day of the full Moon), morning twilight will begin at 5:45 AM EST, sunrise will be at 6:43 AM, solar noon will be at 12:20:41 PM when the Sun will reach its maximum altitude of 43.06 degrees, sunset will be at 5:59 PM, and evening twilight will end at 6:57 PM. On the day before the start of Daylight Savings Time, Saturday, March 13, 2021, morning twilight will begin at 5:25 AM EST, sunrise will be at 6:22 AM, solar noon will be at 12:17:23 PM when the Sun will reach its maximum altitude of 48.49 degrees, sunset will be at 6:13 PM, and evening twilight will end at 7:11 PM. On the first day of Daylight Savings Time, Sunday, March 14, 2021, morning twilight will begin at 6:23 AM EDT, sunrise will be at 7:21 AM, solar noon will be at 1:17:07 PM when the Sun will reach its maximum altitude of 48.88 degrees, sunset will be at 7:14 PM, and evening twilight will end at 8:12 PM. On the day of the spring or vernal equinox, Saturday, March 20, 2021, morning twilight will begin at 6:14 AM EDT, sunrise will be at 7:11 AM, solar noon will be at 1:15:23 PM when the Sun will reach its maximum altitude of 51.25 degrees (90 degrees minus the latitude of NASA HQ), sunset will be at 7:20 PM, and evening twilight will end at 8:18 PM. By Sunday, March 28, 2021 (the day of the full Moon after next), morning twilight will begin at 6:00 AM EDT, sunrise will be at 6:59 AM, solar noon will be at 1:12:58 PM when the Sun will reach its maximum altitude of 54.40 degrees, sunset will be at 7:28 PM, and evening twilight will end at 8:26 PM.

On the evening of Saturday, February 27, 2021, (the day of this full Moon), as evening twilight ends (at 6:57 PM EST), the only planet visible will be Mars, appearing about 62 degrees above the west-southwestern horizon. The bright star appearing closest to directly overhead will be Capella at 83 degrees above the northern horizon. The bright stars of the Orion&ndashCygnus Arm of our home galaxy, including the easy-to-recognize constellation of Orion, will appear spread from the south-southeast up towards Mars. The three stars of Orion's Belt will appear to point to the lower left towards the bright star Sirius at 31 degrees above the south-southeastern horizon. Sirius is the brightest of the stars in our sky (other than the Sun).

As the lunar cycle progresses, the planet Mars and the background of stars will appear to shift towards the west (although it is actually the Earth that is moving around the Sun towards the east). Mars will appear to shift more slowly than the stars (since Mars is moving around the Sun in the same direction as Earth). In mid March Mars will appear near the bright star Aldebaran. On March 19, 2021 the waxing crescent Moon will join Mars and Aldebaran to form a triangle, and the next night, March 20, 2021, will be when Mars and Aldebaran will appear at their closest, about 7 degrees apart.

By the evening of Sunday, March 28, 2021, (the day of the full Moon after next), as evening twilight ends (at 8:26 PM EDT), Mars will appear about 51 degrees above the western horizon. The bright star appearing closest to directly overhead will be Pollux at 79 degrees above the southern horizon. The bright stars of the local arm of our home galaxy, including the constellation Orion, will appear spread from the south up towards Mars. Sirius, the brightest of the stars in our sky (other than the Sun), will appear 33 degrees above the horizon in the south-southwest.

On the morning of Saturday, February 27, 2021, (the day of this full Moon), as morning twilight begins (at 5:45 AM EST), the bright star appearing closest to overhead will be Vega, one of the three stars in the Summer Triangle, at about 61 degrees above the horizon in the east-northeast. A close second will be the bright star Arcturus, appearing 59 degrees above the horizon in the west-southwest. The planet Mercury will appear in the east-southeast about 2 degrees above the horizon, with the fainter planet Saturn appearing about 5 degrees to the right and about 4 degrees above the horizon. About 4 minutes later (at 5:49 AM), the planet Jupiter will rise to the lower left of Mercury, shining brighter than both Mercury and Saturn. To see these three planets you will need a very clear view of the horizon in the east-southeast (something that can be difficult to find in our cluttered urban environments).

As the lunar cycle progresses, the background of stars and planets will appear to shift towards the west each morning, with the exception of Mercury, which will appear to shift towards the east and the horizon. March 1, 2021 will be the first morning that the bright planet Jupiter will appear above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins, appearing brighter than both Mercury and Saturn low in the east-southeast. On March 5, 2021, the planets Jupiter and Mercury will appear closest to each other at the time morning twilight begins, about 1.5 degrees above the horizon in the east-southeast. March 11, 2021, will be the last morning Mercury will appear above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins, although it should be visible in the glow of dawn until about 30 minutes before sunrise.

By the morning of Sunday, March 28, 2021, (the day of the full Moon after next), as morning twilight begins (at 6 AM EDT), the bright planet Jupiter and the fainter planet Saturn will appear with Jupiter about 9 degrees above the east-southeastern horizon and Saturn to the upper right at 14 degrees above the southeastern horizon. The bright star appearing closest to overhead will be Vega, one of the three stars in the Summer Triangle, at about 74 degrees above the eastern horizon. The planet Mercury will be lost in the glow of dawn, rising about 32 minutes before sunrise.

Here is a more detailed, day-by-day listing of celestial events between now and the full Moon after next (again based on the location of NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC):

Friday evening into early Saturday morning, February 19 to 20, 2021, the bright star Aldebaran will appear near the half-lit Moon. Aldebaran will appear about 8 degrees to the left of the Moon as evening twilight ends (at 6:49 PM EST), and will shift a degree or so closer by the time the Moon sets Saturday morning (at 1:39 AM).

By Saturday evening, February 20, 2021, the waxing gibbous Moon will have shifted to about 8 degrees to the upper left of Aldebaran, and the pair will continue to separate after that.

Even though they are not usually visible, I include in these Moon missives information about Near Earth Objects (mostly asteroids) that may pass the Earth within 5 lunar distances, because I find it interesting that we have discovered so many. On Sunday morning, February 21, 2021, at 6:21 AM EST (2021-Feb-21 11:21 UTC), Near Earth Object (2021 DD1), between 8 and 17 meters (25 to 56 feet) across, will pass the Earth at 4.3 lunar distances, traveling at 9.45 kilometers per second (21,100 miles per hour).

Sometime between Sunday morning, February 21, and Wednesday morning, February 24, 2021, Mercury will begin appearing brighter than Saturn (my two sources of brightness predictions differ on the date).

Tuesday morning, February 23, 2021, will be when Mercury and Saturn will appear at their closest together, just 4 degrees apart, low on the east-southeastern horizon (only 2 degrees above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins). After this, Mercury and Saturn will appear to separate, with Saturn continuing higher each morning while Mercury will appear to slow down, then begin to shift back towards the horizon each morning.

Tuesday evening into Wednesday morning, February 23 to 24, 2021, the bright star Pollux, one of the twins in the constellation Gemini, will appear near the waxing gibbous Moon. Pollux will appear about 4 degrees to the upper left of the Moon as evening twilight ends (at 6:53 PM EST). The Moon will reach its highest in the sky for the night (at 9:40 PM) with Pollux appearing about 5 degrees above the Moon. The Moon will set Wednesday morning (at 5:19 AM) with Pollux about 6 degrees to the right of the Moon.

Friday morning, February 26, 2021, the bright star Regulus will appear to the left of the full Moon. The pair will appear more than 8 degrees apart around midnight, but will shift closer together, appearing about 6 degrees apart as morning twilight begins (at 5:47 AM EST).

On Friday morning, February 26, 2021, the planet Mercury will appear at its highest above the horizon for this apparition at the time morning twilight begins, after which it will begin to shift back towards the horizon.

By Friday evening, February 26, 2021, the full Moon will appear to have shifted to the left of the bright star Regulus. As evening twilight ends (at 6:56 PM EST), Regulus will appear about 7 degrees to the upper right of the full Moon, and the pair will appear to separate as the evening progresses.

As mentioned above, the next full Moon will be early Saturday morning, February 27, 2021, at 3:17 AM EST. The Moon will appear full for about three days around this time, from Thursday evening, February 25, through Sunday morning, February 28, 2021.

On Saturday evening, February 27, 2021, at around 8 PM EST (2021-Feb-28 01:14 UTC with 2 hours, 58 minutes uncertainty), Near Earth Object (2021 DE), between 37 and 82 meters (120 to 269 feet) across, will pass the Earth at between 4.2 and 4.3 lunar distances (nominally 4.2), traveling at 25.71 kilometers per second (57,500 miles per hour).

Monday morning, March 1, 2020, will be the first morning when the bright planet Jupiter will be above the horizon as morning twilight begins (at 5:42 AM EST). Jupiter will appear in the east-southeast to the lower left of Mercury, with Saturn to the upper right.

Monday night into Tuesday morning, March 1 to 2, 2021, the bright star Spica will appear near the waning gibbous Moon. Spica will appear to the lower right of the Moon as it rises in the east-southeast (at 9:28 PM EST), Spica will appear below the Moon as the Moon reaches its highest in the sky for the night on Tuesday morning (at 2:55 AM), and morning twilight will begin around 5:41 AM.

Sometime on Monday night to Tuesday morning, March 1 to 2, 2021 (2021-Mar-02 00:01 UTC with 16 hours, 12 minutes uncertainty), Near Earth Object (2011 EH17), between 32 and 71 meters (105 to 234 feet) across, will pass the Earth at between 2.9 and 30.2 lunar distances (nominally 9.5), traveling at 16.83 kilometers per second (37,600 miles per hour).

Just after midnight on Tuesday morning, March 2, 2021, at 12:19 AM EST, the Moon will be at perigee, its closest to the Earth for this orbit.

On Tuesday evening, March 2, 2021, at 8:09 PM EST (2021-Mar-03 01:09 UTC), Near Earth Object (2016 DV1), between 29 and 65 meters (96 to 214 feet) across, will pass the Earth at 2.1 lunar distances, traveling at 18.27 kilometers per second (40,900 miles per hour).

Sometime around Wednesday morning, March 3, 2021 (2021-Mar-03 09:34 UTC with 11 hours, 24 minutes uncertainty), Near Earth Object (2021 DE1), between 8 and 19 meters (28 to 62 feet) across, will pass the Earth at between 4.1 and 4.5 lunar distances (nominally 4.3), traveling at 3.01 kilometers per second (6,700 miles per hour).

On Wednesday evening, March 3, 2021, the planet Mars will appear about 3 degrees from the star cluster known as the Pleiades or the Seven Sisters.

Tuesday morning, March 5, 2021, the bright star Antares will appear about 8 degrees below the waning gibbous Moon. Antares will rise after the Moon in the southeast (at 1:17 AM EST) and will appear about 6 degrees to the lower left of the Moon as morning twilight begins and the Moon reaches its highest in the sky (at 5:37 AM).

Also on Tuesday morning, March 5, 2021, the planets Jupiter and Mercury will appear at their closest to each other at the time morning twilight begins, about 1.5 degrees above the horizon in the east-southeast.

Friday evening, March 5, 2021, the waning Moon will appear half-full as it reaches its last quarter at 8:30 PM EST. For the Americas the half-moon will not rise until early Saturday morning (at 1:44 AM for the DC area).

Saturday morning, March 6, 2021, will be when the planet Mercury reaches its greatest angular separation from the Sun as seen from the Earth for this apparition (called greatest elongation), appearing half-lit through a large enough telescope. Because the angle of the line between the Sun and Mercury and the horizon changes with the seasons, the date when Mercury and the Sun appear farthest apart as seen from the Earth is not the same as when Mercury appears highest above the horizon in the east-southeast as morning twilight begins, which occurred on the morning of February 26, 2021.

Tuesday morning, March 9, 2021, the waning crescent Moon and the planets Saturn, Jupiter, and Mercury, will appear near the horizon from the southeast to the east-southeast. As morning twilight begins the Moon will appear on the right in the southeast at about 7 degrees above the horizon, with Saturn about 8 degrees to the left of the Moon in the east-southeast at about the same elevation above the horizon. The bright planet Jupiter will appear farther to the lower left at about 3 degrees above the horizon and Mercury will appear to the lower left of Jupiter at only 1 degree above the horizon.

By Wednesday morning, March 10, 2021, the waning crescent Moon will appear to have shifted to below and about halfway between Jupiter and Saturn in the east-southeast. As morning twilight begins, Saturn will appear on the right at about 8 degrees above the horizon, the Moon will appear to the lower left of Saturn only about a degree above the horizon, Jupiter will appear to the upper left of the Moon at 3 degrees above the horizon, and Mercury will appear farthest to the left at less than a degree above the horizon.

On Wednesday morning, March 10, 2021, at about 6:45 AM EST (2021-Mar-10 11:45 UTC with 36 minutes uncertainty), Near Earth Object (2021 CF6), between 46 and 103 meters (152 to 339 feet) across, will pass the Earth at between 4.1 and 4.2 lunar distances (nominally 4.2), traveling at 8.36 kilometers per second (18,700 miles per hour).

Thursday morning, March 11, 2021, will be the last morning Mercury will appear above the east-southeastern horizon at the time morning twilight begins, although Mercury should continue to be visible after it rises until about 30 minutes before sunrise.

Saturday morning, March 13, 2021, at 5:21 AM EST, will be the new Moon, when the Moon passes between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from the Earth.

The day of or the day after the New Moon marks the start of the new month for most lunisolar calendars. The second month of the Chinese year of the Ox starts on Saturday, March 13, 2021 (at midnight in China's time zone, which is 13 hours ahead of EST). Sundown on Saturday, March 13, 2021, marks the start of Nisan in the Hebrew calendar. In the Islamic calendar the months traditionally start with the first sighting of the waxing crescent Moon. Many Muslim communities now follow the Umm al-Qura Calendar of Saudi Arabia, which uses astronomical calculations to start months in a more predictable way. Using this calendar the eighth month of the year, Sha'ban will begin at sunset on Saturday, March 13, 2021. Since Sha'ban is the month before Ramadan, it is during Sha'ban that Muslims finalize when to start fasting for Ramadan.

Sunday, March 14, 2021 is the first day of Daylight Savings Time. Don't forget to reset your clocks and "Spring Forward."

The waxing crescent Moon visible for a few nights beginning Sunday, March 14, 2021 (for the Washington, DC area and similar latitudes, at least) is called a "Wet Moon" or a "Cheshire Moon." This is when the thin, waxing crescent Moon appears most like an upward-facing bowl or a smile in the evening sky. According to Wikipedia, the term "Wet Moon" originates from Hawaiian mythology when the Moon appears like a bowl that could fill up with water. The time of year when this occurs as viewed from the latitudes of the Hawaiian islands roughly corresponds with Kaelo the Water Bearer in Hawaiian astrology. As the year passes into summer, the crescent shape tilts each lunar cycle, pouring out the water and causing the summer rains. The term "Cheshire moon" is a reference to the smile of the Cheshire Cat in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Thursday, March 18, 2021, at 1:03 AM EDT, the Moon will be at apogee, its farthest from the Earth for this orbit.

On Friday night, March 19, 2021, the waxing crescent Moon, the planet Mars, and the bright star Aldebaran will form a triangle in the evening sky. Mars will appear about 3 degrees to the lower right of the Moon with Aldebaran appearing about 6 degrees to the lower left of the Moon. Aldebaran will set first in the west-northwest early Saturday morning (at 12:51 AM).

Saturday morning, March 20, 2021, at 5:37 AM EDT, will be the spring or vernal equinox, the astronomical end of winter and start of spring. From on the equator in eastern Kenya the Sun will appear to pass directly overhead, moving from the Southern Hemisphere to the Northern Hemisphere.

Saturday evening, March 20, 2021, will be when the planet Mars and the bright star Aldebaran will appear closest to each other, slightly under 7 degrees apart.

On Sunday morning, March 21, 2021, the Moon will appear half-full as it reaches its first quarter at 10:40 AM EDT.

On Monday evening into Tuesday morning, March 22 to 23, 2021, the bright star Pollux, the brighter of the twin stars in the constellation Gemini, will appear above the waxing gibbous Moon. Pollux will appear about 7 degrees to the upper left of the Moon as evening twilight ends (at 8:20 PM EDT), close to when the Moon will be highest in the sky for the night. Pollux will appear about 5 degrees to the upper right of the Moon by the time the Moon sets in the west-northwest on Tuesday morning (at 4:10 AM).

On Thursday evening into Friday morning, March 25 to 26, 2021, the bright star Regulus will appear about 5 degrees below the waxing gibbous Moon. Regulus will appear to the lower right of the Moon as evening twilight ends (at 8:23 PM EDT). By the time the Moon reaches its highest in the sky for the night (at 11:08 PM) Regulus will appear nearly below the Moon, and Regulus will set first in the west-northwest on Friday morning at 5:43 AM.

On Friday morning, March 26, 2021, the planet Venus will be passing on the far side of the Sun as seen from the Earth, called superior conjunction. Because Venus orbits inside of the orbit of Earth, Venus will be shifting from the morning sky to the evening sky. Venus will begin emerging from the glow of dusk on the western horizon after about April 23, 2021.

The full Moon after next will be Sunday afternoon, March 28, 2021, at 2:48 PM EDT. The Moon will appear full for about 3 days around this time, from early Saturday morning into early Tuesday morning.


Al-Sheikh Dr. Al-Qardawi asked the Muslims who started Al-Eid on Friday to fast another day instead of that one they missed on Friday 07 January. To read the Fatwa, you have three choices:-

    Iran: ICOP member, Mr. Asadollah Mohammadi said: "This is my primary report before the sunset ( It is 3 hours to sunset). In Iran also we have the problem of Saudi Arabia and the announcement of Eid by this country. In Iran people believe that the first day of each month starts one day after the first day in SA (people who don't know astronomy!). So after the announcement of new moon by SA, people are declaring to anticipate in prayer of eid, on saturday. The south-west of Iran including Shiraz is cloudy ( clearly rainy and snowy). So I have no chance to search the new moon. (according to Yallop criterion, only in south-west of Iran the crescent may be seen by telescope). It is not officially announcement of the new moon (tomorrow will be announced). In iran, the people who see the crescent ( or think that have seen it !!) report to Imam-e-Juma`a of their cities. Consequently they report to the leader in Thehran and if the reports are enough, the leader announces the first day of month ( even if the calendar center of geophysics institute of Iran said that it is not possible to see the moon). I hope that all of Iran be cloudy so nobody claims the watching of new moon. I also congratulate the Eid to you and all muslims and I wish the people find the truth."

    ICOP member, Mr. Mohamed Abd El-Rasoul said: "I want to assure that our JAS & ICOP members did not mistake in there observations, no one in Egypt has seen the crescent on Wednesday, and our Dar El-Eftaa declared that aid el-fetr will be Saturday, 8 2000. I've got many calls asking me what happened, of course I could not answer a word. I hope we all will gather upon just one determination specially about moonsighting..etc. I hope one of our Saudi scientists will explain us how and by any astronomical method they determined the beginning of Shawwal . "

  1. There is no crescent moon to see before the birth of the new moon.
  2. There is no moon to see if the moon has already set BEFORE the sunset.
  3. If a moon is 'SEEN' the whole world will see it the same way we see the sun everyday in 24 hours.

Thursday (Jan. 6,2000) evening the Committee for Crescent Observation Intl. received claims of 'seeing a moon' also from: England: (Before the birth of the New Moon, moon set before sunset) US New Jersy, Maryland, Virginia, Florida (2), Kansas (2)=Total 9. These witnesses were "Imams", "presidents", prominent members, etc.

*Five "SAW" a moon BEFORE the SUNSET for 3-10 minutes.
*One saw it from sunset for another 15 minutes before it 'disappeared'. (He could 'see' a moon another five minutes AFTER the MOON had already SET).
*Two "SAW" the moon high above their head to the right of the sun.
* One was 'NOT SURE'.

CFCO observers from all over the world, including Saudi Arabia, Jordan, etc. confirmed "NO Moon SEEN" in clears skies. If those who believe they saw a moon anywhere in the world on Thursday try to SEE it again on Friday evening they will find out that what they "SAW" on Thursday was NOT MOON. They MAY NOT SEE A MOON from Saudi Arabia to Lawrence, Kansas (USA) even Friday evening. Those who missed their last two days of Ramadan in Arab countries by celebrating Eid al-Fitr on FRIDAY should ask Allah's forgiveness and fast two days to compensate for the missed days of Ramadan. The correct dates of Eid al-Fitr based on the "Ahilla" of the Quran and the Sunnah is Saturday only for N. America, and Sunday, Jan. 9, 2000 for the rest of the world. May Allah accept our obedience to Him. Amin."

Later on Dr. Omer sent the below email also: "Some Muslim brothers are willing to go to any length to celebrate Eid on the last day of Ramadan. For this year, they say:

    Yemen, etc. 'SAW' (though Saudi Arabia, Egypt, etc. DID NOT SEE) a moon on Dec. 7 (Tuesday) and started Ramadan on Wednesday. Hence Thursday, Jan. 6 completes the month to 30 days and a Hadith tells the month cannot be more than 30 days. (Three major fallacies:

    In Yemen (or any country) A MOON COULD NEVER be SEEN before the Conjunction.

NONE of The Official Saudi Committees Saw The Crescent on 06 January!

BismillahIrRahmaanIrRaheem
Salaamu Alaykum w.r. w.b.
Belated Eid Mubarak to all. Taqaballah Minna Wa Minkum. Kullo Aam Wa Antum Bakhyr.

Now that the "heat" of Hilal Al-Eid date decision is over, I just wanted to report my experience from Saudi Arabia regarding hilal sighting for Shawwal 1420. As I had mentioned before, I was told that the ruling council of Saudi Arabia has ordered formation of "Hilal sighting committees" which include:

  1. One member of Qada (scholar/justice department)
  2. One member of KACST/Astronomer
  3. One member of Amarah (ruling council of the city)
  4. Plus some more plus volunteers

Currently there are six such committees in Saudi Arabia in: Makkah, Riyadh, Qassim, Hail, Tabuk and Asir. This time I went with the Makkah committee which tries to sight the hilal from the top of the hill in Shamesi - outside Makkah city. We went on the afternoon of Thursday, January 6 and stayed till well after Maghrib. Inspite of clear weather, we could NOT sight the Hilal. Also, I found that NONE of the six hilal sighting committees was able to sight the Hilal.

Further, local scientists showed astronomical data indicating that the moon set in Makkah was BEFORE the sunset on that day. Yet we were shocked to find the announcement of Friday being Eid in Saudi Arabia!! There is some discussion now in local magazines on this topic, which may be a positive sign Insha'Allah. Perhaps the presence of numerous satellites and other objects in the sky causes erroneous hilal sighting. In my humble opinion, if all those who wanted to sight were asked to accompany one of these hilal sighting committees (which include scholar as well as astronomer) and then the Shahada taken, it may solve the problem Insha'Allah. Please make du'a that Allah (SWT) help and guide us all. Ameen.

Jazakum Allahu Khayran. WasSalaam.
Salman Zafar Shaikh.


Rabee' Awwal Waxing (NEW) Crescent Observation Results

So far, the earliest sighting of the crescent was on 30 March 2006 from Brunei Darussalam by ICOP member, Mr. Mahadi Mohamad Tahir.

    Indonesia: ICOP member, Mr. Mutoha MMC said: "Because according to hisab that the crescent set before sunset, we not tried to observed the crescent, just only to confirm that that the crescent not seen. So that the counting of month Shafar 1427 Hejri 'istikmal' to 30 days according to syariah. The result of Rukyatul Hilal Indonesia (RHI) follow this link : http://rukyatulhilal.tripod.com/rabiulawal1427.html"

    ICOP member Mr. Jim Stamm said: "Clouds in Tucson and lack of preparation."

    Brunei Darussalam: ICOP member, Mr. Mahadi Mohamad Tahir said: "The crescent was seen with theodolite at 7.10 pm at the altitude of about 1deg 40min above horizon."

    ICOP member Mr. AbdurRashid Ayoubi said: "Negative sighting. Sky was completely overcast"


30 March 2006

    ICOP member Mr. Javad Torabinejad said: "The moon was very high in sky and very easy to sight."


Understanding Moon Phases

Let’s start with some interesting facts. It takes the Moon 29.53 days to orbit completely around the Earth in a full lunar cycle. During this time, the Moon will go through each phase. Since the Moon’s orbital journey takes a little less than a full month, when you click on future dates you’ll notice that&ndashdepending on the exact number of days in that month&ndashthe Full Moon occurs a day or two earlier each month.

It’s the Moon’s journey as it orbits around Earth that creates the predictable dance between light and shadow. And while the changes may seem slow, on any given day the amount of Moon illuminated by the Sun can vary by as much as 10-percent. The illustration above shows the range of illumination for today - June 25, 2021 . The illustration is set to your computer’s clock and therefore gives you an accurate reading for your own particular time zone.

The four main Moon phases in order are the New Moon, First Quarter Moon, Full Moon and Last Quarter Moon. These phases occur at very specific times and are measured by both the Moon’s luminosity and how far along the Moon is in its orbit around Earth.

The New Moon Phase occurs when the Moon is completely dark with zero-percent luminosity, while the Full Moon Phase is completely bright with 100-percent luminosity. The First and Last Quarter phases happen when the Moon is exactly half illuminated, with 50-percent luminosity. When people say “today is a Full Moon” it’s important to remember that doesn’t mean the Moon is full all day long, only that the Full Moon Phase occurs on this day. In reality, the exact moment of the Full Moon can be timed to the second. To learn more about the exact time of the Full Moon and the current Full Moon info, check out these Current Full Moon times.

The remaining four Moon phases occur at halfway points between the main phases. Unlike the main phases, these minor phases don’t happen at a specific time or luminosity, rather they describe the Moon’s phase for the entire time period between each main phase. These interim phases are Waxing Crescent Moon, Waxing Gibbous Moon, Waning Gibbous Moon and Waning Crescent Moon. The illustration below shows all eight main and minor Moon phases and where they occur in the lunar cycle.


What is the last day a waning moon is visible in daytime (the afternoon)? - Astronomy

Observances During The Blood Moon : During the autumn months, The Blood Moon represents abundance, hunting, gathering and preparing for the cold winter months. It's a time to honor the Harvest and Hunting Gods/Goddesses. Many festivals take place during this time to give thanks and appreciation for the bounty and stockpiles of plenty gathered by a clan or tribe. The Feast of the Hunter's Moon is a long standing practice in Indiana where a living Native American history re-enactment takes place. But similar events can be found around the world and with varying names.

From a magikal point of view, the same concepts can be enacted today for these full moons rituals. They can be used to bring abundance into your life in the form of finances, harvest, health, friendship and love. And to give thanks and honoring the blessings of the Harvest.

A Blood Moon Eclipse : Occasionally, we can find a rare Blood Moon lunar eclipse. This can occur anytime of the year. But how does it happen? Well the Earth casts a long shadow that extends out into space. When the moon passes behind the Earth, opposite of the Sun, (in other words Earth is in the middle), we cast a long shadow that hides the moon. That's what a lunar eclipse is.

Now let's say you had a space ship and traveled out between the Earth and the Moon during an eclipse. Look out the window back at Earth and you'll be looking at the dark side. The Earth will be in silhouette and what you're seeing is every sunrise and sunset on Earth--all at once. This ring of light shines into Earth's shadow, breaking the utter darkness you might expect to find there. Turn off the cockpit lights and look at the Moon and there's a lovely red glow.

What's in the Earths atmosphere will also affect the color or shade of red reflected on the Moon. According to NASA, following a volcanic eruption, for instance, dust and ash can turn global sunsets vivid red. The moon would glow vivid red, too. Lots of clouds, on the other hand, extinguish sunsets, leading to darker, dimmer eclipses. The Moon can shine as Pumpkin Orange to Deep Blood Red all depending on the Earth's weather or natural events.


Thursday, Apil 9th, 2015

Good Morning Readers:
Today we continue in the Waning phase of our April Moon. This is a busy time for us as we make ready in body, mind and spirit for the coming New Moon. Today the moon resides in Sagittarius until 1:42 this afternoon when we enter a time of void-of-course until Friday. Today is also a harvest day for roots and barks as well as time to prune or thin our plants. Light and love I send to thee and until tomorrow Blessed Be.
April Moon:
April is the time of growth and renewal as the first moon of Spring. Native Americans reflect this in their naming of the monthly lunar cycles. April’s moon is known as the Pink Moon, the Full Sprouting Grass Moon by the people of the plains. While for coastal tribes it was the Full Fish Moon because this was the time of year which the shad swam upstream. Presently we are in the Waning Phase of the lunar cycle a time to let go and make ready for the next phase.
Waning Gibbous Moon:
The Waning Gibbous Moon is 77% Full today. Each phase of the moon contains an energy as we move through the lunar cycle each month. It’s energies affect us and the Earth in specific ways. In the Waning Phase, the moon is past full and shrinking more and more each day. It rises late in the night and sets after sunrise. This is the phase of releasing and letting go of that which does not serve us. the Waning Moon reminds us that we must purge ourselves and our lives of the past in order to make room for the future. As we continue in the Waning phase the zodiac as well mirrors this sentiment. Today the moon remains in Sagittarius until 1:42 PM.

Moon in Sagittarius:
Our 9th sign of the zodiac urges us to find comfort in change. As a fire sign, it is creative and dynamic drawing from trust and trust in in it’s instincts. Sagittarius embraces risks and an exuberance for recklessness. It is also a social sign comfortable with a variety of people and accepting of different cultures and outlooks. When the moon is in Sagittarius we can embrace optimism for the future guided by a pioneering spirit which is contagious. Today we will leave behind Sagittarius though at 1:42 this afternoon, entering a void of course period, giving us time to rest before entering the sign of Cancer on Friday.
Void of Course:
The moon enters periods of void-of-course as it phases from one zodiac sign to another. This time of rest and reflection can be a few minutes to a day. It is a time to pause favoring prayer, meditation or meditation. It is the time to pause and attend to the subjective, spiritual side of ourselves. Traditionally, magical workings are not advised during this time for they may not turn out as expected. As in all things, the void of course moon may affect you personally in different ways. Spend a few months observing your personal reactions to this time in order to ascertain your individual response to it.
Harvesting by the moon.
The phases of the moon have guided farmers for centuries with each phase of the moon favoring specific tasks. Today is a harvesting day. In general, from the Full to New Moon is a time favorable for killing weeds, thinning, pruning and mowing. It is also a good time for planting below ground crops and harvesting bark and roots.


Science, the Moon DOES matter

http://www.moonguide.com/new-study-link . -movement/
"In a 2016 joint study, deer biologists from Auburn University, Louisiana State University, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, and Norfolk Southern Railway concluded the moon does play a significant role on deer behavior. This long-term study observed the behavior of deer fitted with radio collars against a variety of environmental influences and with the data collected and analyzed, the researchers discovered a correlation of deer movement patterns to the overhead and underfoot positions of the moon."

Thoughts? Personally, I started tracking it last year and agree with it and the barometer. Anecdotal? Maybe not according to this study. thoughts?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Mike Belt

Well-Known Member

AT Hiker

Well-Known Member

Its important to note that this study shows a "higher probability of movement" not a guarantee.
I read the study, it has been 10 years since I had research methods in graduate school so my comprehension of it was less than stellar.


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Mike Belt

Well-Known Member

Larry ipock

Well-Known Member

http://www.moonguide.com/new-study-link . -movement/
"In a 2016 joint study, deer biologists from Auburn University, Louisiana State University, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, and Norfolk Southern Railway concluded the moon does play a significant role on deer behavior. This long-term study observed the behavior of deer fitted with radio collars against a variety of environmental influences and with the data collected and analyzed, the researchers discovered a correlation of deer movement patterns to the overhead and underfoot positions of the moon."

Thoughts? Personally, I started tracking it last year and agree with it and the barometer. Anecdotal? Maybe not according to this study. thoughts?


Susan Levitt

I receive many emails about selecting surgery dates, so here is some general info:

NEW MOON: The WAXING Moon occurs during the two weeks starting at the new Moon that builds up to the full Moon. This waxing Moon is the time for surgery to ADD (not remove) something to your body, like a new hip, heart valve, or a breast implant for a cancer survivor. So schedule operations to add on the new Moon or during the next nine days after the new Moon.

FULL MOON: Avoid scheduling surgeries or operations of any kind on or close to a FULL Moon. Bruising and swelling is much greater on a full Moon. Like sap rising in a tree or the powerful ocean tides, fluids rise on the full Moon. Avoid surgery three days before or three days after the full Moon because of the full Moon’s strong influence.

DARK MOON: The WANING Moon occurs during the two weeks after the full Moon, as the Moon wanes down. This is the time for surgery to REMOVE something from your body, such as a cyst or tumor. So schedule operations to remove starting three days after the full Moon, or during the last week and a half as the Moon wanes down.

MENSTRUATION: Egg in the light. Bleed in the dark.
Ovulate on the full Moon. Figure out when you menstruate and get your body in sync to produce your egg when the Moon is full.
Menstruate on the dark Moon, preferably on the balsamic Moon, the last day or two of the lunar cycle. This is the quiet time to rest, release your blood, and honor your body. Then you’ll know when you’ll be menstruating so you can plan quiet restful time for your menses during the last days of the lunar cycle. Plan travel and other events, such as athletic meet, on or near the full Moon.

CONCEPTION: Girl or Boy?
A child conceived while the Moon is in a water or earth sign will be female. Water signs are Pisces, Cancer, and Scorpio. Earth signs are Virgo, Capricorn, and Taurus.
A child conceived while the Moon is in a fire or air sign will be male. Fire signs are Sagittarius, Aries, and Leo. Air signs are Gemini, Libra, and Aquarius.
Every day I tweet the Moon signs on my twitter account, so just follow at astrologytweet.

ENTERTAIN, WED, CELEBRATE all under the light of the Moon:
Celebrations are best on the full Moon, or as close to the full Moon as possible. Having an art opening or party? The best attendance will be on a full Moon. An event held on a dark Moon at the end of the lunar cycle will attract only a few people.


Watch the video: Why do we see the moon in the daytime? (January 2023).